Across Regions

Fake scare: Your french fries may not be so deadly after all!

Image result for Your french fries may not be so deadly after allOn June 13, 2017, AARP (the American Association of Retired Persons) released an article titled “Your Fries May Be Deadly,” by Cheryl Bond-Nelms, stating that a recent study links frequent consumption of french fries to a higher mortality risk. The study, which analyzed the dietary habits of 4,400 people, ages 45 to 79, focused on how often participants ate potatoes, fried or not. But, as Joe Kertzman, managing editor of Badger Common’Tater magazine in Wisconsin points out in an article published this month, several sources have taken issue with the article and the original study itself, published by the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. In an excellent article on this issue, Kertzman neatly summarizes the viewpoints of those opposed to the validity of the study, many who put forward scientifically sound arguments that show that not only was the Bond-Nelms study skewed, but that there are much evidence that french fries are actually good for one! 

Kerzman quotes, amongst several others, Jim Schuh of The Portage County Gazette who concluded after an in-depth review of this matter: “…participants in the study likely having an overall unhealthy lifestyle to begin with. So, blaming French fries for premature death alone is ‘fake news,’ to put it in current terminology.” Kerzman for example highlights a release by the Alliance for Potato Research & Education (APRE, www.apre.org) in which it is explained that research shows potatoes can help improve children’s overall diet quality and intake. Kerzman concluded his article by writing: “It’s evident, then, that French fries may not be so deadly after all.” Read Kerzman’s full article