News April 2019

Soil health: Census of Ag shows cover crops in the US surged 50% in 5 years

The adoption of cover crops as a key soil health practice continues at a rapid rate throughout the US, according to new data from the 2017 Census of Agriculture. Cover crops were planted on 15.4 million acres in 2017, an increase of 50 percent over five years, the census shows.

Iowa led the way with a 156.3 percent increase during that period, and a number of other states also more than doubled their cover crop acreage, including Missouri, Illinois, Ohio, Mississippi, Nebraska, Vermont, and Arizona.

“In visiting with my fellow farmers all over the United States, it’s been incredibly gratifying to see so many people committed to the stewardship of our soils,” says Steve Groff, a Pennsylvania farmer and one of a growing number of enthusiastic cover crop experts. “In too many places our soils have become degraded, and we really need to reverse that trend and rebuild the health of our soils going forward. Cover crops are one of the most effective tools we have to restore soil carbon and regenerate our soils.”

The remarkable expansion of cover crop acreage is a result of countless efforts by conservation advocates and others across the country. “My hope is that this pace of increase will continue and even accelerate, leading us to 40 or 50 million acres of cover crops in the next decade,” says Dr. Rob Myers, director of Extension programs for North Central Region SARE.

“The need for additional protection and improvement of our nation’s soils is paramount, as our whole food system depends on having healthy soils.”

According to Myers, a number of factors have contributed to this growth in cover crop acreage.

Read the full article on AgDaily here