McDonald’s french fries might cure hair loss, study finds

Just in case you needed another excuse to supersize your McDonald’s fries, everyone’s favourite crispy potatoes may actually help treat hair loss. Researchers at Yokohama National University in Japan discovered that an ingredient in McDonald’s crispy potato recipe may help with hair regrowth, Refinery29 reports. The study found that “Dimethylpolysiloxane,” a silicone that’s added to the oil to prevent splashing, can aid in the regeneration of “follicle germs” (aka, the spots where new follicles grow out). Dimethylpolysiloxane is an anti-foaming agent made of silicone added to the oil used to cook the famous fries. The silicone yielded some pretty impressive results after three days, which gives all those hair masks we’ve splurged on a run for their money. But there is a catch: The tests were only run on mice hair, not human hair. More

Japan now has french fry ice cream sundaes…

Japanese fast food chain First Kitchen has a bit of an image problem, in that it really doesn’t have much of an image. First Kitchen is often so low-key that it’s easy to overlook the chain, but we’re sure that its newest item, french fry sundaes, will help keep it in people’s minds. Going on this week at First Kitchen and First Kitchen/Wendy’s branches nationwide are two types of Dessert Potato, both of which start by taking a plate of french fries and adding a swirl of Hokkaido dairy-sourced vanilla ice cream. From there, the Choco Sundae Potato adds chocolate sauce and sprinkles. If you’re looking for a more Japanese taste, the Cream Zenzai Potato adds a second dash of Hokkaido flavor with azuki sweet red beans supplied by the northern island plus kuromitsu syrup for even more tempting sweetness. First Kitchen is touting the new desserts as a delicious exercise in contrasting extremes. More

 

US: Will Taco Bell’s new Nacho Fries affect the french fry supply?

Image result for nacho friesWhen ordering tacos from a food service outlet, the last thing you might expect would be this phrase: “Would you like fries with that?” Yet, on Jan. 25, across the nation, diners at Taco Bell will be presented with that question when the chain launches Nacho Fries. However, at the Food Institute, another question is asked: how will this affect the prices of french fries for the industry? Some quick math: if each of Taco Bell’s approximately 6,600 units sells just 100-lbs. of Nacho Fries each day, the company’s total annual usage would be about 240 million-lbs. This number represents roughly 1.5% of the 15.7 billion-lbs. of frozen french fries produced annually. For reference, McDonald’s units sell an average of 250-lbs. of french fries per unit every day, reported Bloomberg (April 19, 2012). Certainly, a lot remains to be seen regarding french fry pricing in the U.S. in the wake of Taco Bell’s new product. More

Report: 5 Key insights on the frozen potato market through 2022

global-frozen-potato-market.jpgAccording to a new study by Fact.MR,  global frozen potato market for frozen potato is estimated to bring in US$ 60,109.5 million revenue by 2022 end. The market is projected to register moderate growth of 4.0% CAGR during the forecast period 2017-2022. The growing business of quick service restaurants and increase in disposable income of consumers are some of the key factors fuelling the growth of the frozen potato market globally. Manufacturers are focusing on using advanced technology for refrigeration at the right temperature, thereby preserving frozen potato for a longer period of time. Some insights discussed in the report show how the global frozen potato market will perform in the next five years. Europe is expected to dominate the global frozen potato market, and North America is expected to emerge as the second most lucrative market. By the end of 2022, modern trade is projected to exceed US$ 25,100 million revenue. More

How chocolate fries and Pikachu helped turn around McDonald’s Japan

McDonald’s Japan took a series of hits starting in 2014 that threatened to crack its Golden Arches: a supplier was selling expired chicken, a human tooth was found in french fries and a child was injured by a plastic shard inside a sundae. Sales plummeted to their lowest since the company went public in 2001, and the chain closed hundreds of restaurants. McDonald’s Corp. in the US said it was considering selling its 49.9 percent stake in the Japanese company as losses piled up. Yet CEO Sarah Casanova decided to counter-punch. Casanova revamped the menu to add local flavors like the pork-and-ginger “Yakki Burger” and quirky headline-grabbing items like chocolate-covered fries. She gave many outlets a facelift and also forged a partnership featuring Pokemon characters. Since then, the shine has returned to the arches. McDonald’s Japan stock closed at an all-time high Sept. 11 as part of a 62 percent increase this year. More

Taiwanese french fry suppliers to be checked amid food concerns

Taiwan’s health authorities will conduct stringent checks of potato suppliers after reports that French fries served at fast food restaurants were found with green patches. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) official Cheng Wei-chih said that potatoes can turn green due to exposure to enough light. However, consuming a large amount of green potato can cause nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea as it often contains a toxic chemical called solanine. No regulations regarding the maximum level of solanine are imposed yet, Cheng added. The scoop of green-tinted potatoes was first posted online by a user of PTT, the largest terminal-based bulletin board system (BBS) in Taiwan. He wrote that his tongue felt weird when he was eating potato wedges at McDonald’s and he found there was a green tint in the food. McDonald’s later responded that the company has adopted strict control measures requiring suppliers and workers to remove green potatoes. More

Were McDonald’s fries better before the ’90s?

In February, The Ringer website ranked McDonald’s french fries as the third-best fast food item in America. But some think that McDonald’s fries used to be much, much better. On a recent episode of his podcast Revisionist History, Malcolm Gladwell uncovered a change that McDonald’s made in its fries in 1992. Were the fries better before then? Gladwell and Joe House discussed the change on the latest episode of House of Carbs. Said Gladwell: “I remember, as I’m sure you remember, how good McDonald’s french fries were back in the day. When I was a teenager and I went to McDonald’s all the time, I went there because of the fries. And then at a certain point, the fries didn’t taste the same. They sucked. I go back there now and they’re not the fries I grew up on. And so I’ve always been curious about this. What happened?” Read the transcript of the discussion on The Ringer website – the transcript has been edited and condensed. Listen to the full podcast here

Acrylamide: Save our fries! Belgians say EU spares national dish

Image result for Save our fries! Belgians say EU spares national dishAccording to a Reuters report, Belgium’s national dish, the deep fried potato sticks that much of the English-speaking world gallingly calls “French fries“, has been saved. So, at least, the national government said last week as the European Union agreed to amend food safety rules aimed at curbing cancer. Belgium’s farm minister claimed the EU will now spare the nation’s “friteries” from having to change traditional preparation methods. “The Belgian fry is saved! Europe has listened to Belgium,” Agriculture Minister Willy Borsus said in a statement. In a statement issued in Brussels, the European Commission said EU governments had agreed to its proposals to force cafes and restaurants to apply measures aimed at reducing the presence of carcinogenic acrylamide in food. Frying, baking and roasting produce the substance out of natural acids and sugars. Some argue that Belgium’s traditional method of frying potatoes twice to get crunchy chips creates more acrylamide. Reuters report

McDonald’s takes on the fast-food dead zone

Image result for mcdonaldsTo lure more mid-afternoon customers, McDonald’s Corp. is rejecting its recent health-food kick and rolling out the sweets: croissants, muffin tops and a new sundae-topping station for ice cream lovers. The challenge is daunting. The hours between lunch and dinner are a fast-food dead zone. Only about 5 percent of McDonald’s customers show up at non-meal times such as 2 p.m. to 5 p.m., according to Peter Saleh, an analyst with BTIG in New York. “You’re going to have to give customers a real reason to come in during that off-peak hour,” he said. McDonald’s has a lot riding on the initiative. McDonald’s is pushing the more indulgent side of snacking with its 620-calorie turtle brownie sundae, topped with hot fudge, caramel, whipped cream and salted pecans. But the chain might do better if it promotes more traditional McDonald’s food during slower afternoon times, according to data from NPD Group. The most-ordered snacks in the U.S. are burgers and fries. More

This is the little-known ingredient which makes McDonald’s fries so delicious

 The fries contain an unusual ingredient which gives them an extra kick of flavourThere’s been some recent confusion over what it is which makes McDonald’s fries so special. It turns out that some branches of McDonald’s are serving up fries with a little-known ingredient added to the mix: “natural beef flavouring”. The beefy addition gives the fries an extra kick of flavour, but it means that they aren’t vegan, since the flavouring is actually made from milk. However, you won’t find this extra ingredient in every branch – and you certainly won’t find it in any UK stores. That’s because Maccies uses different recipes in different countries, with the extra flavouring added in US and Canadian McDonald’s stores. In British branches, the fries are milk free, and don’t contain the beef flavouring which has surprised some American customers. More

US: Fast food makes its biggest change since the drive-thru

Restaurants often lag other industries in adopting new technology, lacking the time or budget for massive digital overhauls. But as industry sales have slowed recently, smartphone conveniences have found their way into the world of burgers and fries. Many in the industry are betting that its future lies in that technology — in large part through mobile orders, payments and delivery. Mobile ordering and delivery from the likes of McDonald’s, Jack in the Box, Wendy’s and Burger King mark the biggest change in the way people order fast food since the drive-thru. As that change ripples through the industry, restaurants are facing down questions like how to preserve margins, avoid parking-lot traffic jams, and keep French fries crispy once they enter the balmy ecosphere of the delivery bag. Just as the drive-thru accommodated generations shaped by mass-market car culture, the new digital efforts cater to a new cohort of fast-food customers shaped by e-commerce, social media, smartphones, streaming video and, in one way or another, a lack of time. Report by Investors Business Daily