History of french fries: All about the origins of the world’s favourite potato fritters

History of French Fries: All About The Origins of the World's Favourite Potato FrittersThin, crisp and oh-so indulgent, there is nothing quite as addictive as French fries. The deep fried potato fritters have caught the fancy of foodies for centuries, across continents and have established themselves as the best sidekick to so many dishes. On its own too, French fries could be quite a snack to munch on. Several historians claim that what we enjoy today as French fries, may not be a French creation but a Belgian one. According to them, it was in Belgium where potatoes were being fried in the late-1600’s. Belgian villagers uses to slice their fish really thin, fry them and eat them as a snack. But in winter months when the river would freeze, it would get difficult for the villagers to fish. What started out as an alternative paved the way for the creation of our beloved French fries. More

Canada: Shipping potatoes to Prince Edward Island cost processors ‘almost more than the potatoes itself’

This year Prince Edward Island processing plants on the east coast of Canada are bringing in potatoes from Alberta in the west of the country and will likely seek supplies from south of the border in the US as well. An eight percent decline in potato production on the Island and growing demand forced processing plants to buy potatoes from Alberta province. There are many obscure and strange feats in the Guinness World Records, but it’s unlikely that hauling potatoes, for distance, is mentioned anywhere in the book. If it was, a record is probably being set in Canada right now, because french fry plants on Prince Edward Island are shipping in potatoes from Alberta, and “the freight is almost worth more than the potatoes,” according to Kevin MacIsaac, general manager of United Potato Growers of Canada..The distance from Alberta to Prince Edward Island is 4,575 km. More

Aviko to join direct-to-consumer movement

INS, the decentralized ecosystem for the grocery market, has announced that leading potato processing company, Aviko intends to be listed on the INS Ecosystem, joining the direct-to-consumer movement. Peter Fedchenkov, INS Founder explained that inequitable pricing, retailer influence and a lack of transparency are all major concerns for both manufacturers and consumers and the direct-to-consumer movement is on the agenda of FMCG companies everywhere. [Fast-moving consumer goods (FMCG) or consumer packaged goods (CPG) are products that are sold quickly and at relatively low cost.] “A direct marketplace powered by emerging technology brings us ever closer to not only addressing these concerns but solving inherent problems within the grocery sector. We are elated with the interest we have received to date from manufacturers worldwide who also wish to evolve their current processes, strengthening the obvious need for the direct-to-consumer movement. We are both delighted and eager to collaborate with Aviko,” added Fedchenkov.

Potato growers make their own chips to fight the big boys

More and more often, potato growers are choosing not to take their products to large processors, because they do their own processing. Besides producing, more and more growers also process their own chips. They enter the processing industry increasingly often nowadays. One of the companies that chose to do things completely differently is Landlust Frites from Moerkapelle in the Netherlands. Derreck Bac is processing his own harvest of Agria and Frieslander into chips for the first time this year. He says it’s going well, although it’s not always easy. “There are many quality requirements. You have to bear in mind 100 things, and if you make just one mistake, quality isn’t what it should be. It’s a very precise business,” says the man running the company with his father and brother. The company Verse Boerderij Friet also makes fresh chips. The family company decided to start processing their own potatoes in 2014. One of the reasons Adriaan also started doing the processing is because he no longer wanted to be dependent on the large potato processing companies that he believes have too much power. More

US: Kettles’s chip bags track potatoes back to farm where they were grown

Chip Bags Track Potatoes Back To The Farm Where They Were GrownKettle Brand potato chip company has started placing Tater Tracker codes on its chip bags for customers to scan and learn about the farmers who supplied the crops for them. The code can be entered on Kettle’s website. When a customer enters the 10- to 14-digit code, they get to learn about one of the farmers who grew the ingredients for their specific bag of chips. The digital content comes with a brief biography about the farmers and an interactive 360 degree video tour of the farm. Kettle listed all of the farmers on its website for anyone to access. These farms include Allied Potato, Bula-Gieringer Farms, Burch Farms, Mortenson Bros. and others. Those interested in trying it out can purchase a bag of Kettle chips and find the code below the ‘best before’ stamp. Kettle Brand Tater Tracker (Source: psfk.com)

Demand for complete potato processing lines on the increase, expert says

According to Arjan Brouwer, general sales manager at processing equipment manufacturer Kiremko, the demand for complete potato processing lines has increased over the past few years and with an unprecedented amount of new lines installed including green-field projects. Worldwide, a lot of new potato processing lines are being built, not only by existing potato processors in Europe but also by new players in other parts of the world such as Argentina, China and Turkey. Brouwer says the demand for complete solutions for potato processing lines is growing is underlined by the increase in demand for potato products all over the world. Belgium, Germany and the Netherlands for example, have seen a noticeable growth regarding potato processing capacity. Also, outside Europe we see that China and South America are huge growth markets in terms of consumption of frozen potato products. “Unlike in the old days, designing and manufacturing processing equipment is rather more complex than welding some stainless steel together.” More

UK: FSA prepares guide for acrylamide management

The UK Food Standard Agency (FSA) and Food Standards Scotland are working with the British Hospitality Association and other key stakeholders to develop simple guidance which will help the catering and foodservice sectors comply with new rules regarding acrylamide. Food businesses, including potato processors in the UK will be required to put in place practical steps to manage acrylamide within their food safety management systems, under new EU legislation, which will apply from April 2018. The legislation describes practical measures based upon best practice guidance developed by the food industry to mitigate acrylamide formation in a range of foods. Guidelines to aid understanding of the enforcement of the legislation will also be available in the New Year. More

Study shows advantages of locating next North American potato fry plant in Idaho

Any processor planning to build a new frozen fry plant would be wise to locate it in Idaho, according to a recently completed economics study funded by the Idaho Potato Commission. Joe Guenthner, an emeritus University of Idaho economics professor, and Amanda Jaeger, a consultant, compared costs of building and operating a fry plant in eight different locations in the US and Canada, as well as transportation costs from those locations to major fry markets. The list included Idaho, Washington, North Dakota, Wisconsin and Maine in the US, and Alberta, Manitoba and New Brunswick in Canada. One processor, McCain Foods, is already undertaking an Idaho expansion, investing $200 million to boost production at its Burley plant. Guenthner believes the industry is poised for further growth. “I understand most or all processing plants in North America are running at full capacity, and growth in demand is coming from overseas,” Guenthner said. “The industry is growing, and there will be expansion somewhere.” Capital Press report

British processed potato exports rising; fresh potato sales continue long-term downward trend

Great Britain processed potato exports are up by 24%, while imports are also up by 5%, according to AHDB GB Potatoes Market Intelligence 2017–2018 report. Net import of fresh potatoes reached 54,000t, up by 22%, while seed exports have increased 3% and exports are down by 60%. “Although this comes as no surprise, due to the poor yields achieved on the continent in the previous year, seed was in very high demand and was reported to be fetching upwards of EUR/1,000/t for certain varieties,” according to the report. This was driven by a 62% reduction in seed from the Netherlands. According to the report, fresh potato sales have continued their long-term downward trend over the past five years, with volume sales declining by 4% and value sales declining by 19% in the period. On the other hand, AHDB conducts a consumer tracker survey to monitor attitudes toward potatoes, finding that 76% of consumers eat potatoes on a weekly basis and when asked, 71% of people surveyed said they considered potatoes to be healthy. More

New report: Global Potato Chips Market 2017-2021

Image result for potato chipsAccording to the authors of Global Potato Chips Market 2017-2021 report, consumers across the globe tend to purchase potato chips more than any other snacks, as they are ready-to-eat and filling. And increasing snacking by consumers has also helped the market growth over the years. Hence, the potato chip category is more relevant than ever in terms of snacks. The analysts forecast the global potato chips market to grow at a CAGR of 4.58% during the period 2017-2021. The report covers the present scenario and the growth prospects of the global potato chips market for 2017-2021. The report was prepared based on an in-depth market analysis with inputs from industry experts. It covers the market landscape and its growth prospects over the coming years. The report also includes a discussion of the key vendors operating in this market. More

How Frito-Lay is making its products healthier

Indian Tikka Masala, Yorkshire Pudding and Salmon Teriyaki Lay's potato chips“Somebody was telling me the other day that we have over 3,000 flavors in what we call our flavor bank,” said Christine J. Cioffe, Ph.D., senior vice-president, Sustainability and Global Snacks R.&D. at PepsiCo, Inc., parent company of Frito-Lay. “I think it speaks to the power of a company that operates across 200-plus countries.” Flavor, Dr. Cioffe said, is a “stronghold” for Frito-Lay. “It’s definitely a capability that R.&D. has built and strengthened over the last decade or so,” she added. “Flavor is going to continue to be an opportunity.” Meanwhile, the product development team at PepsiCo is focused on making its snacks healthier. The company has committed to limiting sodium and saturated fat while adding whole grains, vegetables and protein, said Elizabeth Roark, registered dietitian and principal scientist, PepsiCo Nutrition Services. In its Performance with Purpose 2025 Agenda PepsiCo outlined its nutrition goals. More

Belgium to join Indonesian food expo to boost fries exports

Belgium to join Indonesian food expo to boost fries exportsThe Belgian Potato Trade and Processing Industry Federation (Belgapom) will take part in the major Indonesian food expo SIAL Interfood 2017 to be held at the Jakarta International (JI) Expo Kemayoran in Central Jakarta from Wednesday to Saturday, in an effort to boost its frozen-potato sales. Belgapom representative Wouter Trybou said it was part of a two-year campaign to boost exports of Belgian fries. The five exporters of fries that will join the event are Agristo, Bart’s Potato Company, Clarebout Potatoes, Ecofrost and Mydibel. “This year is the first year of our campaign. We’re targeting B2B [business to business] transactions in food services, the retail sector and quick-service restaurants. Next year, we’ll target more in the retail sector,” he told a press briefing on Monday. More

Report: Asia-Pacific Processed Potatoes Market

Related imageAsia-Pacific Processed Potatoes Market 2017 Research report contains a qualified and comprehensive analysis of the processed potato market. The report provides an overview of the current processed potato business scenario along with an evaluation of the processed potato industry. Geographically, the report split Asia-Pacific into several key Regions (Southeast Asia, Australia, India, Japan, China, South Korea and Taiwan), with revenues, sales, market share and growth rate of Processed Potatoes for these regions. The Processed Potatoes market research report also explores the available markets throughout Asia-Pacific regions from 2017 to 2022 (forecast). The report provides a research study of the Processed Potatoes market based on development opportunities, growth limiting factors and feasibility of investment. More

Canada: How McCain Foods keeps its family-business feeling at global scale

Farmers in a potato field with tractor“Would you like some fries with that?” If you said yes—anywhere in the world—odds are one in three you were served a McCain Foods french fry. Not an insignificant accomplishment for a family of potato farmers from the small village of Florenceville, New Brunswick province in eastern Canada, who built the world’s largest manufacturer of frozen potatoes. Founded by Harrison and Wallace McCain, as well as their brothers Andrew and Robert, in 1957, McCain Foods Limited celebrated its 60th anniversary this year by investing more than $1 billion into its plants and facilities. For Shai Altman, president of McCain Foods (Canada), that investment aptly captures the company’s long-term strategic thinking, focus on its core values, and commitment to sustainable growth. “We constantly refocus our business to areas where we have competitive advantage,” Altman says. McCain’s careful attention to growth strategies is one of the reasons it’s recognized as a Best Managed Company by Deloitte. More

Fast food restaurants driving increased demand for frozen potatoes in Japan

After storms decimated Japanese potato production in MY 2016/17, a recent report issued by the USDA’s Foreign Agricultural Service in Japan (FAS/Tokyo) forecasts a substantial recovery of Japanese potato production in MY 2017/18 to 2.315 million metric tons, largely restoring production to pre-typhoon levels. Strong growth in Japan’s fast food and restaurant sectors, drove increased demand for frozen potato products such as french fries. Accordingly, FAS/Tokyo forecasts a six percent increase in Japan’s import and consumption of frozen potato products in MY 2017/18 (to 385,000 MT). Despite a reduced planted area in MY 2017/18, FAS/Tokyo also forecasts Japan’s fresh potato production to recover substantially to 2.315 million MT, an increase of 7.2 percent from MY 2016/17, but 2.7 percent less than MY 2015/16. Much of the recovery can be attributed to the planting of off-standard seed potatoes, which allowed farmers to stretch the available seed potatoes. Full report