Canada: McCain’s state-of-the-art potato specialty production line officially opened

McCain Foods marks 60th business anniversary with official opening of new $65M production line expansion in Florenceville, NB. From left to right: Hon. Andrew Harvey, New Brunswick Minister of Agriculture, Mines and Rural Affairs,  Andrea Davis, Director Government and Public Relations at McCain Foods Canada; Shai Altman, President of McCain Foods Canada; Jeff Delapp, President, North America, McCain Foods Limited;  Marc Kilfoil, Plant Manager McCain Foods Canada;  Allison McCain, Chairman, McCain Foods Limited; Dale McCarthy, Vice President Integrated Supply Chain, McCain Foods Limited; Germain Pinette, Manufacturing Director,  McCain Foods Canada; ; TJ Harvey, M.P. for Tobique-Mactaquac; Nancy Whyte-McCauley, Deputy Mayor, Florenceville-Bristol. (CNW Group/McCain Foods (Canada))McCain Foods (Canada) has officially opened its new $65M state-of-the-art potato specialty production line, expanding the company’s flagship potato processing facility in FlorencevilleBristol, in the province of New Brunswick. The new 35,000 square foot McCain Foods potato specialty production line addition represents the largest capacity expansion investment in Canada in nearly 10 years.  The investment is reflective of the continued growth of the North American frozen potato and potato specialty segments in both the retail and food service businesses. “Florenceville continues to be the French fry capital of the world. The official opening of the new production line reflects McCain’s ongoing commitment to invest in the needs of our consumers and customers today, and also the company’s focus towards future product development and innovation,” said Jeff DeLapp, President, North America, McCain Foods Limited. More

Zebra chip pathogen found in Western Canada for the first time

Image result for zebra chip imageFor the first time, evidence of the zebra chip pathogen has been found in potato fields in southern Alberta, but the University of Lethbridge’s Dr. Dan Johnson cautions against panic. “So far, the zebra chip pathogen has appeared in only small numbers of potato psyllids,” says Johnson, a bio-geography professor and coordinator of the Canadian Potato Psyllid and Zebra Chip Monitoring Network. “The number of potato psyllids in all Alberta sites is very low and many sample cards have found no evidence of the potato psyllid insect. Zebra chip does not normally become a problem unless the potato psyllids are found in much higher numbers than are currently being found in Canada.” An infected potato psyllid insect carries the Lso (Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum) pathogen that can cause zebra chip disease in potato crops. Zebra chip has affected potato crops in the United States, Mexico and New Zealand and caused millions of dollars in losses. Potatoes with zebra chip develop unsightly dark lines when fried, making affected potatoes unsellable. More

Report: 5 Key insights on the frozen potato market through 2022

global-frozen-potato-market.jpgAccording to a new study by Fact.MR,  global frozen potato market for frozen potato is estimated to bring in US$ 60,109.5 million revenue by 2022 end. The market is projected to register moderate growth of 4.0% CAGR during the forecast period 2017-2022. The growing business of quick service restaurants and increase in disposable income of consumers are some of the key factors fuelling the growth of the frozen potato market globally. Manufacturers are focusing on using advanced technology for refrigeration at the right temperature, thereby preserving frozen potato for a longer period of time. Some insights discussed in the report show how the global frozen potato market will perform in the next five years. Europe is expected to dominate the global frozen potato market, and North America is expected to emerge as the second most lucrative market. By the end of 2022, modern trade is projected to exceed US$ 25,100 million revenue. More

US: Lamb Weston unveils new $200 million potato processing line

Whether waffle-fried or straight-cut, call Richland a french fry capital. This morning, Lamb Weston unveiled its new $200 million expanded processing line for frozen potato products. The line will double the Richland plant’s capacity to 2 million pounds a day of frozen fries. The 290,000-square-foot, state-of-the-art expansion will added another 150 jobs to the Tri-City economy. Lamb Weston has produced frozen fry products in Richland since 1972. With the new line, the plant now has the combined capacity to produce an estimated 600 million pounds of frozen potato products annually. .It sources most of the potatoes it processes from within 60 miles, making it the region’s largest buyer of locally-grown. The company has said the rising global demand for fries and frozen potato products drove the expansion. More

‘Chipocalypse’ in New Zealand as wild weather spikes price of potatoes

ChipsThe “chipocalypse” has reached New Zealand, after heavy rain caused a shortage of potato crops and a spike in prices. Supermarkets have been forced to place signs in their chip shelves, explaining to hungry customers why the beloved snack is out of sto“It started raining in March, and it just simply hasn’t stopped,” Chris Claridge, head of trade association Potatoes New Zealand, told Radio Live NZ. “Potatoes are actually alive — they need to breathe. And so, effectively, they drown and then they start to rot… because they’re submerged in water.” Two major floods have wiped out around one fifth of crops, with some regions seeing 30 percent of crops destroyed. Around 75,000 tonnes of potatoes are made into chips every year, which means these shortages will will havea detrimental effect on the snack. This shortage of potatoes has filtered down to food prices. In New Zealand, wIn New Zealand, where a kilogram of potatoes cost $1.28 last August, it’s now shot up to $1.67 this year. Potato chips are even scarce on shelves. Potato chips are even scarce on shelves. More

Lamb Weston reports strong first quarter

Image result for lamb weston logoLamb Weston has released its figures for the first quarter of the 2018 fiscal year and the company said the numbers are positive and that it reaffirms the company’s outlook for the coming year. “Our strong start to the year reflects a good balance of sales growth, supply chain productivity and cost discipline,” said Tom Werner, Lamb Weston president and CEO. In the coming months, Lamb Weston is scheduled to start up a new production line in Richland, Washington. Due to developments like that, the company expects to remain on track to deliver on its full-year targets. More

Canada: New equipment fuels growth for Covered Bridge Potato Chip Company

New equipment fuels growth for Covered Bridge Potato Chip CompanyThe Covered Bridge Potato Chip Company will boost production to accommodate the growing demand for its products, thanks to a $437,500 investment from the Government of Canada. The investment includes a new line for the production of popcorn. The investment will also help increase export capacity and is expected to create up to 14 new jobs. TJ Harvey, Member of Parliament for Tobique-Mactaquac, on behalf of the Honourable Navdeep Bains, Minister of Innovation, Science and Economic Development and Minister responsible for the Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency (ACOA), was joined by Ryan Albright, President of the Covered Bridge Potato Chip Company, to make the announcement yesterday. More

New Zealanders could soon be eating crisps and chips made from GE potatoes

New Zealanders could soon be eating crisps and hot chips made from GE potatoes, with little idea of the added health risks from genetic engineering. Food Standards Australia New Zealand (FSANZ), which has just approved six new lines of GE potatoes for human consumption, has breached its duty of care to consumers, says the Soil & Health Association. Last week the Trans-Tasman food regulator released its decision approving the sale of food derived from potatoes that have been genetically engineered for disease resistance to foliar late blight, reduced blackspot bruising and reduced acrylamide potential. The potatoes are aimed at fast food outlets and the frozen chip and crisps market. “FSANZ has a legal requirement to protect the health and safety of people in Australia and New Zealand through the maintenance of a safe food supply,” says Soil & Health chair Graham Clark. “By approving these potato lines without sufficient evidence to prove that they are safe to eat, FSANZ has effectively breached this legal requirement.” More

Leading starch manufacturer to build plant in Ukraine

At the end of October, starch manufacturer VPP “Vimal” will open a new plant on the outskirts of Chernihiv, Ukraine. Launching a new company will increase the production capacity of the company more than ten times. The new plant will have a capacity of about 1200 tones of potatoes per day. The company carries out construction by one of its divisions – “Vimal-Spetsbud”. The new plant will be equipped with the company Larsen’s machines: this is reported by the magazine “Offer” with reference to the director of the firm Sergei Samonenko. The company will produce starch that meets European standards, and will be certified by the world’s leading advanced quality management systems and product safety. The plant will be able to produce up to 600 t starch per day and the number of workers will exceed 50 people. More

Indian dairy co-operative enters french fry market

New french fry manufacturer in India Amul sets up shop near competition in GujaratIn India, the Gujarat Co-operative Milk Marketing Federation (GCMMF) is starting the production of frozen French Fries in October of this year. They have set up shop in North Gujarat, close to McCain Foods India and Hyfun Frozen Foods. Their entry into the market could be favorable for potato farmers because the co-operative dairy giant is now planning to directly procure potatoes from farmers, just as they do for their 3.6 million dairy farmers that jointly own the cooperative. GCMMF is launching frozen french fries, potato wedges, hash browns and burger patty (aloo tikki) products under their Amul / Taste of India brand. McCain Foods India, the subsidiary of the Canadian multinational currently procures its potatoes mainly from North Gujarat, which may cause some competition for potatoes for processing. More

Belgium aims to export more frozen potato fries to Malaysia

According to a report by New Straits Times, Belgium hopes to ship in more frozen potato fries to Malaysia, collaborating with restaurateurs and fast food operators in the country. “Belgian chocolates are famous all over the world. Today, we’re seeking to promote Belgian fries here,” said Belgapom secretary general Romain Cools. Belgapom is the association for the Belgian potato trade and processing industry which promotes exports of 4.4 million tonnes of potatoes a year. “Malaysia is a fast growing market for Belgian potatoes,” he told reporters at a media conference and cooking demo at the Food & Hotel Malaysia 2017 event held in Kuala Lumpur today. “We seek to increase our market share here for potato fries. Belgian fries is in third placing here as most of the potato fries served at fast food restaurants are being imported from Northern America and the Netherlands,” he added.  Continue reading

Japan to support domestic potato production after poor harvest

Japan to support domestic potato production after poor harvestThe agriculture ministry in Japan will help domestic potato farmers increase production following a halt in sales of some potato chip products in the country due to a potato shortage, sources said Tuesday. The ministry has included ¥3 billion for related costs in its budget request for fiscal 2018, the sources said. Some 80 percent of potatoes for chips are grown in Hokkaido Prefecture. The potato crop was poor there last year due to typhoons, forcing major domestic snack makers Calbee Inc. and Koike-Ya Inc. to halt sales of some products from spring this year to September. To help Hokkaido farmers keep supplying enough potatoes to the processors, the ministry plans to shoulder half of the farmers’ costs for introducing large harvesting machines and potato varieties that are resistant to diseases and pests, the sources said, adding that it will also back efforts to boost production of seed potatoes. More

Lamb Weston: Potato harvest analysis yields mixed Wall Street results

Image result for lamb weston logoJefferies Wall Street market analyst, Akshay Jagdale, reiterated his Buy rating on shares of Lamb Weston (NYSE: LW) after analyzing the potato harvest in North America and Europe. The analyst stated “we are maintaining our positive view on industry fundamentals and continue to believe there is upside to FY18 guidance/estimates owing to better than expected price/mix, volume and JV earnings growth”. Despite the positive outlook, he did not update his view on pricing exceeding expectations but is incrementally positive on European potato COGS and neutral to slightly negative on NA potato COGS. No change to the price target of $53. Shares of Lamb Weston closed at $45.38 yesterday. For an analyst ratings summary and ratings history on Lamb Weston click here. For more ratings news on Lamb Weston click here. (Source: Streetinsider.com)

Studies show increase of global market for processed potato products

Reports made by research companies show the increase of the global market for processed potato products. Although the increase is not high, it has been a steady one in the past three years. PotatoBusiness.com analyzed two reports regarding the potato chips market and frozen finger potato chips. The global potato chips market will grow at a CAGR of 4.58% during the period 2017-2021, according to the “Global Potato Chips Market 2017-2021” report recently launched by Research and Markets. The latest trend gaining momentum in the market is the innovative product offerings. Manufacturers of potato chips are tapping on the heavy demand for health foods by offering chips made from healthy ingredients. The demand for functional and non-GMO ingredients is high due to the rising cases of obesity, diabetes, gluten allergy, and other maladies. More

Potatoes South Australia wins grant to develop vodka from waste potato peelings

In an effort to combat food waste, Potatoes South Australia has teamed up with the University of Adelaide and Adelaide Hills Distillery to make vodka from potato skins. Robbie Davis, chief executive officer of Potatoes SA, said at a national level, food loss in the agricultural industry — pre farm gate — was $3 billion annually. “But the horticulture component of that is $1.8 billion dollars annually, and potatoes are the biggest contributor,” she said. Potatoes South Australia received $30,000 for the project from the State Government. Ms Davis said although whole potatoes were already used to make vodka, they hoped to determine if a premium SA spirit could be made using only waste potato peel. “Having gone to lots of processing plants — what is happening to the skins? Why shouldn’t we try and use them for something?” she said. “The potential is just phenomenal. We want to do a comparison between different varieties of potatoes and their skins, and we will also do a comparison with whole potatoes.” More